German Teutonic Order Museum

Homepage Deutschordensmuseum

The castle of Mergentheim was the residence of the Grand Masters and Deutschmeister of the German Teutonic Order from 1525-1809. In 1996 the museum was opened with around 3000 m² of exhibition space. The 800-year history of the German Teutonic Order from 1190 to the present day is illustrated with objects, works of art and models.

The German Teutonic Order castle has a rich architectural history. There are Romanesque structural elements (residential quarter covered footpaths), Renaissance (Berwart staircase), Rococo (gods room) and Classicism (chapter hall). The jewel of the residence is the castle church, for which artists such as Balthasar Neumann and François de Cuvilliès were called in to assist with the building.

The history of Mergentheim from the time of the Frankish settlement up to its present status as a spa town is shown.A Mörike cabinet is reminiscent of the poet’s stay in the town (1844-51). In 1864, Baron Carl Joseph von Adelsheim donated his collection of antiquities to the town and these now form a separate department in the museum. 40 doll kitchens, parlours, houses and shops (19th/20th century) illustrate life in past centuries.

The museum in the German Teutonic Order castle offers a rich programme of events for children and adults, as well as holding as several special exhibitions each year.

Admission prices
Adult: € 6,--
Concessions: € 4,50 
Children under 6 years: Free
Children/teenagers (6-17 years old): € 2,--
Groups of 20 or more: € 5,-- per person
Spa guests with spa card: € 5.50

Opening hours:

April - October: Tuesday- Sunday/Public holidays: 10.30 am- 5 pm

November- March: Tuesday- Saturday: 2 pm- 5 pm; Sunday/Public holidays: 10.30 am - 5 pm

Tours: Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays: 3pm on Thursday (April-October): Tour for (spa) guests 3.30 pm and by appointment.

Address

Schloss 16
97980 Bad Mergentheim
Telephone: +49 7931 52212
Fax: +49 7931 52669
info@deutschordensmuseum.de

Further information at:
Homepage Deutschordensmuseum